Rough start for remediation agreements
Illustration: Dushan Milic

Rough start for remediation agreements

The proper use of newly minted remediation agreements was always going to be a judgment call. Now it appears judgment may have been seriously lacking in what would have been the very first application of a new Criminal Code amendment allowing corporations to avoid prosecution.

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April, 2019
  • Rough start for remediation agreements

    The proper use of newly minted remediation agreements was always going to be a judgment call. Now it appears judgment may have been seriously lacking in what would have been the very first application of a new Criminal Code amendment allowing corporations to avoid prosecution.
  • Due diligence gets a makeover

    When it comes to conducting due diligence in mergers and acquisitions, it’s all about looking for risks in a haystack of data, thanks in large part to the proliferation of documents and information to review for a proposed deal.
  • Map the data

    Fitness trackers are just one of the data-gathering devices that we either wear or stare at too many times in a day that have exploded in popularity in recent years. They are also increasingly offered to staff as part of employee wellness programs in large companies.
  • Communication while in crisis

    If circumstances arise where there is a need to consider retaining outside litigation counsel, it is almost certainly not a good news situation for a private sector company or government entity.
  • The role of in-house in AI adoption

    When I left private practice and went in-house, I was given valuable advice from a mentor of mine. She said that my role is not just about being an advisor to my business clients and it was important that I not limit myself to being just a “legal risk manager.”
  • Relationship effectiveness

    Amid the hype and ongoing dialogue around the future of law and innovation in the legal profession, the reality is many small law departments in Canada still feel effective legal advice and suitable fee arrangements come not from new service delivery models but through good management and long-term cultivation of relationships with external counsel.
  • Law Department Management

    Controlling the contract lifecycle

    While it may seem obvious that establishing a contract lifecycle management system would improve the way contracts are handled, it is more than possible that in-house departments could derive additional benefits from such a system in the form of getting themselves more time.

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