Monday, 03 April 2017 09:00

Halifax

HalifaxCollegiality is evident throughout the profession, but competition for work is still fierce.
Published in Features
Monday, 03 April 2017 09:00

Learning from Heenan Blaikie’s miscues

When national law firm Heenan Blaikie LLP blew up in early 2014, I covered the story for Canadian Lawyer, writing about a Frankenstorm of events that caused the firm’s demise.
Published in Commentary
Transitioning to lead counsel: How junior lawyers can make the leapThe first few years of legal practice are tough. But once you’ve got a handle on the job, the next step is to transition to more senior roles. This transition can be summarized in two key steps: 1) Build hard skills; and 2) Earn your employer and/or client’s trust to take on lead counsel roles.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 13 March 2017 09:00

A time of transition - Part 2

A time of transition - Part 2This article is a continuation of 'A Time of Transition' from the March issue of Canadian Lawyer magazine. Click here to read Part 1.
Monday, 06 March 2017 09:00

A time of transition - Part 1

A time of transition - Part 1Significant changes have hit the legal economy in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and out-of-province interest is not abating.
Monday, 06 March 2017 09:00

Heenan Blaikie breakdown

Photo: Robin Kuniski
Photo: Robin Kuniski
Three years after the collapse of the law firm he helped build, Norman Bacal reflects with his version of the inside story.
Published in Departments
Monday, 14 November 2016 10:40

Vancouver City Report

Vancouver City ReportLaw firms are being hit with a flood of legal work as Asian investment continues to grow
Published in City Reports
Monday, 31 October 2016 09:01

Nimble and focused

Nimble and focusedIn-house counsel are constantly challenged to find the right legal providers for the problem at hand, and at the same time the solution also has to fit the always-under-pressure budget.
Published in Issue Archive
How juniors can get more advocacy opportunities“The vanishing trial” is the catchphrase used to describe the reality of civil litigation: Trials and other advocacy opportunities are fewer and farther between. Lawyers, especially junior lawyers, do not get the same advocacy opportunities that once were commonplace. Even worse is that when those opportunities do come along, clients often want the senior, experienced counsel to argue. What is a junior lawyer to do? Refusing to accept the fate of lawyers of my vintage, I have uncovered ways in which the junior lawyer can get on her feet. Here are my top seven tips: 
Published in Web exclusive content
Darwin’s paradise: Welcome to Season 74 of Survivor: Lawyers in the Wilderness“Paddle, paddle, paddle! Harder, harder, harder!”
Published in Web exclusive content
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