Displaying items by tag: courts

Monday, 30 March 2015 08:00

Defending yourself for being in court

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Standard_photos_richard-johnson.jpgRecently, I was in court on a summary trial and was asked plainly why my case had not been resolved.
Published in Web exclusive content
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Standard_photos_David_Fraser.jpgI often represent victims of true cyber bullying, including adults whose lives have been turned upside down by malicious online actors, so I am very sympathetic to the nominal goals of Nova Scotia’s Cyber-safety Act. But the legislation fails to take into account — in any way — that all expression is protected by the Charter and can only be regulated or suppressed by reasonable limits, prescribed by law.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 02 March 2015 08:00

Light through the window

Illustration: Martin O'Neill
Illustration: Martin O'Neill
There were two casualties of the Canadian Judicial Council’s inquiry into Justice Lori Douglas. The first was Lori Douglas, by all accounts a competent and hard working associate chief justice of the Family Division of the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench. The other was the Canadian Judicial Council itself, which found itself battered and bruised in a four-year inquiry that turned the mirror on itself and its procedures.
Monday, 02 March 2015 08:00

Grey divorce is all about the math

Illustration: Jeannie Phan
Illustration: Jeannie Phan
A few years ago Steven Benmor found himself in divorce court representing an 82-year-old client seeking to end a long-term marriage. After decades of living with the same man, she was divorcing her abusive husband. “They had fought over the years but this time he hit her and she said ‘screw you’ and went to the police. He was arrested and removed from the home. The children came out of the dark to help her and took sides. That created the divorce,” he says.
Published in Features
Monday, 02 March 2015 08:00

Taking on the big guns

Photo: Kim Stallknect
Photo: Kim Stallknect
Aniz Alani says he’s “just a guy with a credit card and some vacation time.”
Published in Departments
Domestic violence issues will cut across many areas of law but the question remains whether it should be mandatory in law school, says Nick Bala.
Domestic violence issues will cut across many areas of law but the question remains whether it should be mandatory in law school, says Nick Bala.
While law schools continue to implement mandatory classes on domestic violence for first-year students, the burden to solve domestic violence cases should not fall on law schools alone, says one Queen’s University law professor.
Published in Latest News
Ronald Snyder says the decision ‘completely reshapes the law of employment dismissals in this country.’
Ronald Snyder says the decision ‘completely reshapes the law of employment dismissals in this country.’
A Federal Court of Appeal decision eight months in the making is being called a “monumental decision” that “essentially overturns almost 40 years of arbitral law.”
Published in Latest News
Monday, 02 February 2015 08:00

Data fit for the courtroom?

Illustration: Matthew Billington
Illustration: Matthew Billington
The next time you post the stats of your morning run to Facebook via RunKeeper or enter some health data to your iPhone, think about this: what if down the road someone sought to use it against you?
Published in Features
Monday, 12 January 2015 11:42

Quebec Innu win right to sue Rio Tinto

Quebec’s appeal court handed hands victory to First Nations in their lawsuit against Rio Tinto subsidiary Iron Ore Co. of Canada.
Quebec’s appeal court handed hands victory to First Nations in their lawsuit against Rio Tinto subsidiary Iron Ore Co. of Canada.
An Innu First Nations group in Quebec has won a battle in the Quebec Court of Appeal over the right to proceed with a $900-million lawsuit against a subsidiary of mining giant Rio Tinto.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 12 January 2015 10:37

Is Google search evidence admissible?

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_BH-Shirt-and-Jacket.jpgAssessing and searching for evidence and facts constitute a significant part of lawyers’ roles in representing clients. While litigators probably utilize these functions much more intensively than do solicitors, it is likely a matter of degree and extent.
Published in Web exclusive content
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