Displaying items by tag: courts

Domestic violence issues will cut across many areas of law but the question remains whether it should be mandatory in law school, says Nick Bala.
Domestic violence issues will cut across many areas of law but the question remains whether it should be mandatory in law school, says Nick Bala.
While law schools continue to implement mandatory classes on domestic violence for first-year students, the burden to solve domestic violence cases should not fall on law schools alone, says one Queen’s University law professor.
Published in Latest News
Ronald Snyder says the decision ‘completely reshapes the law of employment dismissals in this country.’
Ronald Snyder says the decision ‘completely reshapes the law of employment dismissals in this country.’
A Federal Court of Appeal decision eight months in the making is being called a “monumental decision” that “essentially overturns almost 40 years of arbitral law.”
Published in Latest News
Monday, 02 February 2015 08:00

Data fit for the courtroom?

Illustration: Matthew Billington
Illustration: Matthew Billington
The next time you post the stats of your morning run to Facebook via RunKeeper or enter some health data to your iPhone, think about this: what if down the road someone sought to use it against you?
Published in Features
Monday, 12 January 2015 11:42

Quebec Innu win right to sue Rio Tinto

Quebec’s appeal court handed hands victory to First Nations in their lawsuit against Rio Tinto subsidiary Iron Ore Co. of Canada.
Quebec’s appeal court handed hands victory to First Nations in their lawsuit against Rio Tinto subsidiary Iron Ore Co. of Canada.
An Innu First Nations group in Quebec has won a battle in the Quebec Court of Appeal over the right to proceed with a $900-million lawsuit against a subsidiary of mining giant Rio Tinto.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 12 January 2015 10:37

Is Google search evidence admissible?

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_BH-Shirt-and-Jacket.jpgAssessing and searching for evidence and facts constitute a significant part of lawyers’ roles in representing clients. While litigators probably utilize these functions much more intensively than do solicitors, it is likely a matter of degree and extent.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 08 December 2014 09:08

Beware the long arm of the U.S. courts

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_Margaret_L_Waddell.jpgThe United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit has confirmed that courts can take “long arm” jurisdiction over a Canadian resident corporation, even when the company has no physical presence in the American jurisdiction, and the only contact between the parties was by electronic and telephone communications across the border.
Published in Web exclusive content
‘When you are acting for a corporation, the organization is the client — not the shareholders, officers, or employees,’ says Edgar Schidt.
‘When you are acting for a corporation, the organization is the client — not the shareholders, officers, or employees,’ says Edgar Schidt.
“There is a little bit of larceny in all of us.”
Published in Latest News
Monday, 27 October 2014 08:00

De novo certification hearings on appeal

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_kirkbaertnew2013.jpgIn August, the Ontario Divisional Court released its decision in Sherry Good v. Toronto Police Services Board, in which it found the elements required for certification had been met on appeal, reversing an earlier certification refusal in these G-20 class actions. This is despite the fact “[t]he proposed class action, as presented on this appeal, was markedly different from the proposed class action that was considered by the motion judge.”
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 29 September 2014 10:23

The trouble with criminal speech

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_October_CriminalCode.jpgIn 2011, an RCMP officer called Karen MacKinnon at her home in Drumheller, Alta. and asked her to come into the station for an interview. He wanted to talk to her about comments she had made on Facebook. She was wary at first, but agreed to meet with him and drove down to the station in her truck.
Published in Features

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_Margaret_L_Waddell.jpgFollowing the 2010 Supreme Court of the United States decision in Morrison v. National Australia Bank, there was significant speculation in many quarters that Canada would become the class action haven for internationally scoped securities class actions.
Published in Web exclusive content
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