Displaying items by tag: Litigation

Monday, 26 January 2015 08:00

Winning formula

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_2015_February_Profile-Deborah-Greenberg-f.jpgEach year, the Association of Corporate Counsel, in tandem with the International Law Office, honours the world’s top in-house lawyers at its Global Counsel Awards gala in New York City. Last June, Deborah Greenberg, vice president and general counsel for Aimia, Canada the loyalty rewards management company, won the trophy in the “General Commercial” category.
Published in Issue Archive
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_Margaret_L_Waddell.jpgIn 2002, Part XXIII.1 was added to the Ontario Securities Act. It established a statutory cause of action for investors damaged by secondary market misrepresentations disseminated by publicly traded corporations or their officers and directors.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 12 January 2015 10:37

Is Google search evidence admissible?

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_BH-Shirt-and-Jacket.jpgAssessing and searching for evidence and facts constitute a significant part of lawyers’ roles in representing clients. While litigators probably utilize these functions much more intensively than do solicitors, it is likely a matter of degree and extent.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 05 January 2015 08:00

Wrong result. Still good law.

Photo credits: Guy Paul Morin: Alan Dunlop - Toronto Star; David Milgaard: Rick Eglinton - Toronto Star; William Mullins-Johnson: Lucas Olenuik - Toronto Star; Robert Baltovich: Colin McConnell - Toronto Star
Photo credits: Guy Paul Morin: Alan Dunlop - Toronto Star; David Milgaard: Rick Eglinton - Toronto Star; William Mullins-Johnson: Lucas Olenuik - Toronto Star; Robert Baltovich: Colin McConnell - Toronto Star
In a brief oral judgment issued in late January 1995, then-chief justice Charles Dubin of the Ontario Court of Appeal formally entered an acquittal for Guy Paul Morin, ending a decade-long ordeal for the man wrongly convicted in the death of nine-year-old Christine Jessop. Fresh evidence, based on new DNA testing, excluded Morin. No jury “properly instructed in the law and acting judicially, could convict Mr. Morin on the charge upon which he stood trial,” stated Dubin, in the ruling issued 20 years ago. After two trials and nearly two years in custody, Morin was finally cleared of any responsibility in the 1984 rape and murder of Jessop, a crime that remains unsolved.
Monday, 05 January 2015 08:00

Uncharted territory

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2015_January_UnchartedTerritory.jpgA wise trial lawyer of the greyish set said to me, not without exasperation: “This e-discovery stuff is a bother. When I started practice, I would ask the client for the hot documents, and they would be sent to me.” How times have changed.
Published in Commentary
‘This legislation proposed is terrible,’ says Brian Radnoff.
‘This legislation proposed is terrible,’ says Brian Radnoff.
The province of Ontario is trying once again to introduce legislation to stop litigation brought to stifle opposition to issues of public interest.
Published in Latest News
Friday, 05 September 2014 09:00

Access Copyright’s next chapter

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_2014_September_IS-CopyrightSymbol-shutters.jpgFollowing a landmark Supreme Court decision and amendments to Canada’s Copyright Act, it’s “business unusual” for Access Copyright, the country’s largest copyright-holder group. The organization is battling tough challenges in Copyright Board proceedings. It faces the prospect of dwindling revenues from post-secondary institutions, and as it moves ahead with a lawsuit against York University, copyright experts wonder if the organization will have much of a business among the ivory towers in the future.
Published in Issue Archive
‘If you’re planning on claiming privilege, stamp it,’ says Malcolm Aboud.
‘If you’re planning on claiming privilege, stamp it,’ says Malcolm Aboud.
When undertaking an investigation in preparation for litigation, there’s always a danger it could fall into the other party’s hands through discovery. Litigation privilege doesn’t automatically apply to all investigative reports commissioned by a party.
Published in Latest News
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_kirkbaertnew2013.jpgThe Class Proceedings Act,1992 was intended to promote access to justice. To do so, it incentivizes lawyers to undertake class actions with contingency fee agreements and the availability of premium fee awards. However, if class counsel are not adequately and consistently provided an amount that fairly compensates them for the seriousness of the risks undertaken over the course of many years, the purpose of the legislation as set out by the framers of the act will not be achieved.
Published in Web exclusive content
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_margaret-waddell.jpgThe Alberta Court of Appeal released a surprising decision in Andriuk v. Merrill Lynch Canada Inc., in which it has imported the obligation of establishing evidence of class-wide loss from the specialized field of price-fixing actions to a claim grounded in breach of contract and breach of fiduciary duty causing a depreciation in share price.
Published in Web exclusive content
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>
Page 1 of 15

Latest Videos

More Canadian Lawyer TV...

Digital Editions