Displaying items by tag: Law Society

Monday, 11 May 2015 08:00

The new LSUC, the old A2J problems

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_Standard_photos_Christopher-Achkar.jpgWith bencher election results in and the Law Society of Upper Canada getting a facelift, this administration will be under more scrutiny than any previous LSUC board for its action plan on access to justice. The profession is far from settled on having a comprehensive and effective plan to promote access to legal services, and we are likely to hear loud calls for accountability.
Published in Latest News
I’m tired of “no comment.” It’s a hackneyed phrase that lawyers (and organizations) rely on far too often and doesn’t serve a client’s interest. There’s nothing that suggests guilt more than seeing a lawyer or client running the media gauntlet trying to shove cameras out of the way or cloak their faces as they barge by a pack of microphones and TV cameras.
Published in Commentary
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_Standard_photos_Ian-Holloway.jpgMaybe the best movie line ever about law school was delivered by John Houseman in The Paper Chase. Playing the imperious contracts professor Charles W. Kingsfield, he famously said to first year student James Hart and his classmates: “You come in here with a skull full of mush. . . . And if you survive,” he continued in all his stentorious magnificence, “you’ll leave thinking like a lawyer.”
Published in Latest News
Monday, 06 April 2015 08:00

Seeing justice done

Here’s what we do know: the Law Society of Upper Canada is conducting some type and/or number of investigations into document reviewers working in Ontario. What we don’t know: pretty much everything else.
Published in Commentary
Dan Revington is one of a handful of in-house and public sector lawyers running in the LSUC bencher election this year.
Dan Revington is one of a handful of in-house and public sector lawyers running in the LSUC bencher election this year.
While almost 100 lawyers have put their name forward to run for bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada, only a handful of those are in-house or public sector lawyers.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 02 March 2015 08:00

Winnipeg: holding steady

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2015_March_file_644.jpgOn a brisk winter morning, with the temperature a mere -20 C and rising, senior litigator Dave Hill had his day and evening mapped out, including a way to beat the elements. After a full day of work, he planned to use the enclosed downtown Skywalk, to walk from his office on Main Street to the nearby MTS Centre to watch the Winnipeg Jets play that night. “I wish we had more tickets,” says Hill, as the arena for the NHL hockey team is routinely sold out.
Published in City Reports
Monday, 02 March 2015 08:00

It’s time to scrap articling

As the law school year winds down across the country, Canada’s medium and large law firms begin preparations for the annual legal rite of passage — articling. That’s when hordes of lawyer wannabes, fresh out of torts and civil procedure, disperse across law firms, and anxiously seek to dip their toes in the legal waters.
Published in Commentary
Domestic violence issues will cut across many areas of law but the question remains whether it should be mandatory in law school, says Nick Bala.
Domestic violence issues will cut across many areas of law but the question remains whether it should be mandatory in law school, says Nick Bala.
While law schools continue to implement mandatory classes on domestic violence for first-year students, the burden to solve domestic violence cases should not fall on law schools alone, says one Queen’s University law professor.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 16 February 2015 08:00

What we know about legal education

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_Standard_photos_Ian-Holloway.jpg“That’s because we perfected the model.”
Published in Latest News
Monday, 02 February 2015 08:00

The great debate of 2015

The great debate of 2014 was the future of articling. That issue has by no means been resolved; the Law Society of Upper Canada’s experimental alternative to articling has yet to prove itself worthy. As the first group goes through the Law Practice Program, there are definitely differing points of view on its value. But only time will tell how well prepared those LPP students will be to practise but also how those students will be accepted and valued in the profession compared to colleagues who went through traditional articles. Stay tuned on that.
Published in Commentary
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