Displaying items by tag: Inhouse counsel

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_Standard_photos_F.Garcia.jpgIt used to be a common understanding in the legal community that the road toward an in-house position required that you first pay your dues within a law firm as an articling student and then as an associate. This was seen as the only way of learning to apply the law and slowly understanding what the client needed and how the lawyer was able to meet these needs.
Published in Latest News
Going paperless made tracking invoicing more efficient and effective.
Going paperless made tracking invoicing more efficient and effective.
Tracking law firm invoices can be a time consuming task for any legal department, but especially so when you’re managing the legal affairs of a pharmaceutical company with many external providers. Catching mistakes can be a challenge, but reviewing each bill in an efficient way is critical to getting a real handle on legal spending.
Published in Latest News
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_Standard_photos_renato-pontello.jpgIn the wake of the corporate scandals in the late 1990s and early 2000s involving misappropriation of resources, bribery, fraud, breach of fiduciary duties, and other such shenanigans, there was a large public outcry on the part of shareholders, the media, the regulators, the government, and other community stakeholders asking “where were in-house counsel, were they asleep at the wheel?”
Published in Latest News
Monday, 27 April 2015 08:00

Time to pull together

Over the last year or two, it has been interesting to watch as the dialogue on alternative fee arrangements has moved from a push coming from innovative in-house counsel looking to draw law firms into the discussion, to now law firms championing the discussion as a marketing tool.
Published in Issue Archive
Monday, 27 April 2015 08:00

Beyond succession planning

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_2015_May_LawDept-Opener.jpgThe things that tended to get a lawyer noticed when they were at a law firm many not necessarily be what gets them promoted in the legal department once they go in-house. Working long hours and driving client satisfaction is part of it, to be sure, but once a lawyer is in a corporate legal function other factors and skill sets come into play in terms of advancement.
Published in Issue Archive
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_Standard_photos_IH-InClosing-SanjeevDhawan.jpgAbout five years ago, I had the opportunity to be part of an audience listening to the general counsel of Google, Kent Walker, and the general counsel of Microsoft, Brad Smith, discuss what the future law department would look like. They spoke about the role of technology and how it would shape the work of in-house counsel. Productivity gains would be driven by increasing collaboration and the flow of information. Everyone would have greater access to legal knowledge and information. They also spoke about the “commoditization” of legal services where routine, repetitive legal services could be outsourced. On its face, this would seem to lead to a diminished role for in-house counsel. However, the ranks of corporate counsel continue to grow. The theme of the discussion was also that, no matter what technology brings, in-house counsel will continue to be essential to the organization. This is because in-house lawyers are always needed to synthesize information, to add judgment, insight, and wisdom.
Published in Issue Archive
Around the issue of privilege, companies must decide what the ultimate purpose of the report is going to be, says Michelle Henry.
Around the issue of privilege, companies must decide what the ultimate purpose of the report is going to be, says Michelle Henry.
When it comes to the protection of privilege around internal investigations, in-house counsel need to stickhandle the issue carefully especially in light of some recent cases on both sides of the border.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 13 April 2015 08:00

Disrupting or just evolving?

Cost pressures are the largest motivators for new ideas in the legal business.
Cost pressures are the largest motivators for new ideas in the legal business.
Corporate law departments under pressure to cut costs may be the main driver behind a revolution in the provision of legal services, but when it comes to innovation they may be hamstrung by their own lack of budgets to pull it off themselves.
Published in Latest News
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_Standard_photos_renato-pontello.jpgIn-house counsel play an important role in ensuring their clients exercise appropriate corporate governance — “appropriate” being the operative word. Applying big company practices holus bolus to start-ups and small- to medium-sized enterprises can be as inappropriate as shooting from the hip and ignoring tried and true governance practices which have benefited companies as they have scaled.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 23 March 2015 08:01

Doing business with the bear

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_2015_April_in_apr_15.jpgWhen Canada introduced its first sanctions against Russia, back in March of 2014, it was the big players like Bombardier and Kinross Gold that landed on the radar screen.
Published in InHouse Cover Story
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>
Page 1 of 32

Latest Videos

More Canadian Lawyer TV...

Digital Editions