Displaying items by tag: Criminal Law

Monday, 29 September 2014 10:23

The trouble with criminal speech

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_October_CriminalCode.jpgIn 2011, an RCMP officer called Karen MacKinnon at her home in Drumheller, Alta. and asked her to come into the station for an interview. He wanted to talk to her about comments she had made on Facebook. She was wary at first, but agreed to meet with him and drove down to the station in her truck.
Published in Features
Monday, 29 September 2014 10:23

An abiding belief in the system

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_October_D.Bayne.jpgThere are many words to describe Donald Bayne, a member of the defence bar for some 43 years, but one of his associates has a choice few. “You would expect him to be incredibly intimidating but he’s not so at all,” says Meaghan Thomas, one of Bayne’s colleagues at Bayne Sellar Boxall LLP in Ottawa. “He’s a wonderful guy, incredibly approachable, and probably one of the happiest lawyers around. He’s got so much energy.”
Published in Departments
The Hunt, directed by Thomas Vinterberg, released 2012
The Hunt, directed by Thomas Vinterberg, released 2012
A curious anomaly in our justice system; the offence with the most severe penalty under law is not the crime toward which most people feel the most personal revulsion.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 07 July 2014 08:00

Moving to the other side

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_July_J.Lowry.jpgFor 33 years Jim Lowry put accused criminals in jail. Now he’s defending them.
Published in Departments
Monday, 05 May 2014 08:01

Bad law

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_May_cl-may-14-pg-01.jpgIt was just last summer that a team of lawyers led by Alan Young persuaded the Supreme Court of Canada to strike down the country’s prostitution law. But the seeds of the litigation were sown 25 years earlier, in the chill, pre-dawn hours of a Toronto morning. Young, a young lawyer at the law office of legendary criminal lawyer Alan Gold, had fielded an urgent call from a client who operated a dingy brothel near the city’s downtown bus depot. The joint was being raided, and the nervous client wanted help.
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_May_final.jpgIn what might be the most high-profile seizure ever of a smartphone in Canada, police obtained a court order and travelled to the United States earlier this year to extract information from the iPhone of a friend of Toronto Mayor Rob Ford. Toronto police were unable to analyze the device allegedly belonging to Alexander “Sandro” Lisi “because they did not have the current forensic tools to extract information from the phone,” stated a sworn affidavit by an officer in the investigation dubbed Project Brazen 2.
Published in Features
If your O-rings are made of Viton, they can’t be exported to Iran. (Photo: Shutterstock)
If your O-rings are made of Viton, they can’t be exported to Iran. (Photo: Shutterstock)
An Alberta oilfield equipment company has been fined $90,000 for attempting to send a shipment of parts to Iran and violating federally imposed sanctions against that country. It is the first Canadian company to be sanctioned for exports to Iran.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 03 March 2014 08:00

Black law students honour judge, mentor

Justice Donald McLeod speaks to Semhar Woldai and another Osgoode law student after accepting the Lincoln Alexander Award. Photo: Zachary Pedersen
Justice Donald McLeod speaks to Semhar Woldai and another Osgoode law student after accepting the Lincoln Alexander Award. Photo: Zachary Pedersen
One of Ontario’s newest judges has been awarded The Honourable Lincoln Alexander ‘53 Award from the Black Law Students’ Association at Osgoode Hall Law School.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 20 January 2014 08:00

What not to do in the war on drugs

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_Screen-shot-2014-01-16-at-6.jpgJust after midnight on Jan. 1, a former U.S. Marine named Sean Azzariti made history by becoming the first person in the world to legally buy marijuana for recreational use. Azzariti, who served in Iraq and claims the weed helps relieve his post-traumatic stress disorder, made his purchase just as a new law allowing its licensing and sale in Colorado came into force.

Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 18 November 2013 08:00

A very texting question

Illustration: Alexi Vella
Illustration: Alexi Vella
In the three decades federal law enforcement has been required to report to Parliament on the number of times it receives judicial authorization to conduct electronic surveillance on individuals, its use has declined steadily. From a high of 1,300 warrants issued for audio and video surveillance in 1976, the number dropped to 95 in 2012 and the annual total was just over 100 intercepts in each of the previous four years. The irony in the steep drop in seeking approval for wiretaps is seizure of private communications by local, provincial, and national police is now likely higher than ever and the legal hurdle is arguably much lower than the test for what are known as Part VI authorizations under the Criminal Code.
Published in Features
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