Displaying items by tag: Criminal Law

If your O-rings are made of Viton, they can’t be exported to Iran. (Photo: Shutterstock)
If your O-rings are made of Viton, they can’t be exported to Iran. (Photo: Shutterstock)
An Alberta oilfield equipment company has been fined $90,000 for attempting to send a shipment of parts to Iran and violating federally imposed sanctions against that country. It is the first Canadian company to be sanctioned for exports to Iran.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 03 March 2014 08:00

Black law students honour judge, mentor

Justice Donald McLeod speaks to Semhar Woldai and another Osgoode law student after accepting the Lincoln Alexander Award. Photo: Zachary Pedersen
Justice Donald McLeod speaks to Semhar Woldai and another Osgoode law student after accepting the Lincoln Alexander Award. Photo: Zachary Pedersen
One of Ontario’s newest judges has been awarded The Honourable Lincoln Alexander ‘53 Award from the Black Law Students’ Association at Osgoode Hall Law School.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 20 January 2014 08:00

What not to do in the war on drugs

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_Screen-shot-2014-01-16-at-6.jpgJust after midnight on Jan. 1, a former U.S. Marine named Sean Azzariti made history by becoming the first person in the world to legally buy marijuana for recreational use. Azzariti, who served in Iraq and claims the weed helps relieve his post-traumatic stress disorder, made his purchase just as a new law allowing its licensing and sale in Colorado came into force.

Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 18 November 2013 08:00

A very texting question

Illustration: Alexi Vella
Illustration: Alexi Vella
In the three decades federal law enforcement has been required to report to Parliament on the number of times it receives judicial authorization to conduct electronic surveillance on individuals, its use has declined steadily. From a high of 1,300 warrants issued for audio and video surveillance in 1976, the number dropped to 95 in 2012 and the annual total was just over 100 intercepts in each of the previous four years. The irony in the steep drop in seeking approval for wiretaps is seizure of private communications by local, provincial, and national police is now likely higher than ever and the legal hurdle is arguably much lower than the test for what are known as Part VI authorizations under the Criminal Code.
Published in Features
Monday, 09 September 2013 09:56

Human rights on campus

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_sonyanigam.jpgWhen one hears the call “back to school” we tend to think of small children and teenagers and grade school. However, we can also include young adults and university campuses in that refrain.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 09 September 2013 09:00

Lawyers and their demons

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_lee-akazaki-revised.jpgThis summer, the bar became poorer for the admission of a convicted sex offender, and for the departure from this world of an honourable defender of some of history’s monsters.
Published in Web exclusive content
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-INHOUSE_2013_September_crowdfunding.jpgStart-ups and small businesses may soon have an easier time getting access to cash as the Ontario Securities Commission takes the next step in developing a crowdfunding regulatory framework.
Published in Latest News
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:08

Q & A with Peter Jenkins

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_2013_September_qa-peter-jenkins2.jpgAdjunct professor Peter Jenkins teaches a course at Osgoode Hall Law School called Legal values: Law, ethics & social media. Offered for the second time in the winter 2014 term, it’s a small first-year course open to 20 students, with five spots reserved for upper-year students. Jenkins spoke with 4Students assistant editor Heather Gardiner about the course.
Published in Issue Archive
Wrong Side of the Law: True Stories of Crime by Edward Butts; Dundurn Press, 2013; pp. 224; $19.99.
Wrong Side of the Law: True Stories of Crime by Edward Butts; Dundurn Press, 2013; pp. 224; $19.99.
As of this writing, American fugitive Edward Snowden — on the lam after releasing details of the National Security Agency’s domestic and international spying programs — is stuck in the international transit area of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport. A hundred years ago, Snowden might have had an easier time escaping the clutches of the U.S. justice system — he could have just hopped over the sparsely populated, largely unguarded border with Canada and found a nice spot to hide out.
Published in Web exclusive content
Monday, 15 July 2013 09:00

Toews: the provocative lawman

As Public Safety minister, Vic Toews ‘saw issues of protection of the public as his own personal duty.’ Photo: Chris Wattie/Reuters
As Public Safety minister, Vic Toews ‘saw issues of protection of the public as his own personal duty.’ Photo: Chris Wattie/Reuters
It is a bit unusual to be asked to sum up the political life of a former minister of the Crown who is simply retiring, even after 18 years of public service. But, then again, Vic Toews was no usual public servant. He had the ability to provoke strong reactions whether it be from conservative pundit Matt Gurney, who asked for his resignation over the failed Internet surveillance legislation, or from NDP MP Charlie Angus, who made the ungracious farewell comment that the minister will be remembered as “spite[ful] and shortsighted.”
Published in Web exclusive content
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