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Video: View 2013: Preparing for the regulatory road ahead with Geoffrey CreightonIn the third of six videos from the Canadian Lawyer InHouse View 2013 series, sponsored by Blake Cassels & Graydon LLP, IGM Financial Inc.’s SVP and general counsel Geoffrey Creighton talks about how the federal government’s anti-spam legislation affects the company’s lines of business and why diversity can happen organically.
Answering the questions around pro bono for in-houseAll lawyers have heard of the public’s need for increased access to justice and the growing demands this places on the legal system. All lawyers know they have a social and professional responsibility to assist individuals who need legal services but who cannot afford them.
Source: ACC CLO 2013 survey
Source: ACC CLO 2013 survey
Chief legal officers say compliance and ethics issues dominate their agendas these days, followed closely by regulatory changes, according to a survey conducted by the Association of Corporate Counsel.
Video: View 2013: Preparing for the regulatory road ahead with Daniel MarionIn the second of six videos from the Canadian Lawyer InHouse View 2013 series, sponsored by Blake Cassels & Graydon LLP, Thales Canada Inc.'s vice president, general counsel and secretary Daniel Marion talks about the new anti-corruption law in Quebec and other challenges his department faces in the year ahead.
Nicole Broley says taking on a pro bono case doesn’t require a significant amount of time.
Nicole Broley says taking on a pro bono case doesn’t require a significant amount of time.
Nicole Broley is an experienced commercial litigator with a big professional services firm but lately she has been getting her feet wet in the area of family law. It’s all part of a pro bono project launched by the Association of Corporate Counsel Ontario.

Video: View 2013: Preparing for the road ahead with Alaine GrandIn the first of six videos from the Canadian Lawyer InHouse View 2013 series, sponsored by Blake Cassels & Graydon LLP, AstraZeneca Canada Inc.'s chief legal counsel Alaine Grand talks about the challenges she faces in the year ahead.

Monday, 21 January 2013 08:00

Tomorrow’s [in-house] lawyers

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Tomorrow’s [in-house] lawyersWhile in London, England, last week, I had the privilege of attending a party to celebrate the launch of Tomorrow’s Lawyers, the fascinating new book by Richard Susskind. I fully anticipate this book — like its predecessor The End of Lawyers? —will stimulate much debate in the legal community. David Allgood, executive vice president and general counsel of the Royal Bank of Canada, calls it, “A must-read for anyone interested in the future of legal services.” I found it especially valuable as I work on a research project for the Association of Corporate Counsel to identify skill sets for the GC of the future.
Steven Salterio says generalist judges and prosecutors don’t cut it in complicated corporate law trials.
Steven Salterio says generalist judges and prosecutors don’t cut it in complicated corporate law trials.
Those who had hoped for a different outcome in the acquittal of three former Nortel Networks executives might want to consider that judges and Crown attorneys might need more experience with corporate law to get a conviction in future trials.
Associations in Canada provide the basics but fall short There is, predictably and understandably, more interest in specific issues than in the profession as a whole. In-house lawyers are not unique in focusing on more immediate matters: Have I fulfilled my mandatory continuing professional development obligations? Do I have the information and skills I need to do my job well? Do I feel part of a community? Are my professional networks intact? As I look around however, I see relatively few of us are interested in the evolution of the role of in-house lawyers and I’d hazard a pretty educated guess fewer still care about the political organization of in-house lawyers or the associations and other groups that represent in-house lawyers.
The Competition Bureau is seeking massive penalties from Direct Energy and Reliance Comfort for anti-competitive behaviour in the water heater market. Photo: Shutterstock
The Competition Bureau is seeking massive penalties from Direct Energy and Reliance Comfort for anti-competitive behaviour in the water heater market. Photo: Shutterstock
The Competition Bureau is taking aim at two dominant players in the hot water heater market by seeking orders prohibiting the companies from engaging in further anti-competitive conduct and seeking administrative penalties of $15 million from Direct Energy and $10 million from Reliance Comfort Ltd.
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