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Brian Radnoff says a letter of reference from an MP for someone before the courts could be seen as a member of the government trying to influence the court.
Brian Radnoff says a letter of reference from an MP for someone before the courts could be seen as a member of the government trying to influence the court.
Should a sitting member of Parliament be providing a letter of reference on behalf of someone who is awaiting sentencing for kidnapping the lawyer for the City of Oshawa?
Monday, 15 February 2016 09:00

A GC’s advice to law schools

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A GC’s advice to law schoolsRecently, an esteemed colleague of mine wrote on her Facebook page that a successful senior lawyer told her, in discussing the difficulties experienced by articling students in finding placements, that if students are alumni from  specific Canadian law schools, their likelihood of future success was minimal, and that their investment in their legal education was not worth it.
Monday, 15 February 2016 09:00

Case clarifies obligations of patent applicants

Written by
 Peter Wilcox, president of the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada
Peter Wilcox, president of the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada
Most people have probably never heard of the Public Servants Inventions Act, but a Federal Court of Appeal has ruled it can’t stand in the way of a man and his valid patent.
Monday, 08 February 2016 09:48

Big Data’s potential for in-house

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Big Data’s potential for in-houseBig Data is here and it is here to stay. Retailers collect and analyze billions of customer purchases every hour, looking for buying trends to better target their marketing efforts. Credit card companies constantly analyze incoming transactions searching for indicators of fraud. Social media platforms curate, store, analyze, and sell data that is invaluable to advertisers. As WikiLeaks has demonstrated, governments scour, record, and analyze massive amounts of information daily, including data mined from their closest allies.
Durham County Courthouse
Durham County Courthouse
The wife of Oshawa’s city solicitor says that on the night three years ago that her husband David Potts was kidnapped at gunpoint by a former councilor, she feared she might never see him again.
ACC Alberta chapter president Lorne O’Reilly says some in-house lawyers have returned to private practice during the downturn.
ACC Alberta chapter president Lorne O’Reilly says some in-house lawyers have returned to private practice during the downturn.
Even in tough times it seems in-house departments are bulking up and adding operations team members, but legal departments in the oil and gas sector are taking a hit as that sector continues to feel the pinch.
Monday, 25 January 2016 09:00

A career well crafted

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Wawanesa Insurance general counsel is retiring after 20 years serving in in-house roles.
Wawanesa Insurance general counsel is retiring after 20 years serving in in-house roles.
When asked what his plans are for retirement, George Bass pauses and is somewhat at a loss for words.
Monday, 18 January 2016 09:00

Time for a change?

Written by

Time for a change?

Time for a change?

Humans are creatures of habit. We are prone to getting comfortable quickly and tend to like maintaining the status quo, especially when it comes to our jobs. Making a change requires a lot of ground work, it involves meeting new work colleagues, learning a new role, new processes, new reporting structures, sometimes a new industry and, most importantly, moving away from your comfort zone.

This week, the Supreme Court of Canada will hear the appeal in last year’s most-talked about labour and employment law case.
This week, the Supreme Court of Canada will hear the appeal in last year’s most-talked about labour and employment law case.
Almost a year to the date the Federal Court of Appeal overturned almost 40 years of arbitral law, tomorrow the Supreme Court of Canada will hear Joseph Wilson’s leave to appeal the decision in Wilson v. Atomic Energy Ltd.
White-collar crime lawyer Norm Keith says project manager in Metron case did not have ‘criminal intent.’
White-collar crime lawyer Norm Keith says project manager in Metron case did not have ‘criminal intent.’
The construction project manager found guilty of criminal negligence in the deaths of four workers who fell from a scaffold in 2009 was sentenced to 3.5 years’ jail in a Toronto court today.
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