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The appeal court speaks on limitations (again)In 2004, Ontario enacted its new Limitations Act, 2002, which was intended to streamline and simplify the law governing the shelf life of causes of action in the province. In general terms, it imposed a universal two-year limitation period to commence a proceeding, subject to some limited carve-outs for the limitation periods expressly stipulated in specified statutes, and subject to the discoverability principle, which was incorporated in s. 5 of the act. If not expressly preserved by the new act, all limitation periods in other statutes were of no force or effect pursuant to s. 19.
Video: Making Rain: Be your own chief advocateIn the July episode of Making Rain, executive coach Debra Forman discusses maintaining consistent control of your professional growth and advancement by strategically informing others of your successes.
Wrong Side of the Law: True Stories of Crime by Edward Butts; Dundurn Press, 2013; pp. 224; $19.99.
Wrong Side of the Law: True Stories of Crime by Edward Butts; Dundurn Press, 2013; pp. 224; $19.99.
As of this writing, American fugitive Edward Snowden — on the lam after releasing details of the National Security Agency’s domestic and international spying programs — is stuck in the international transit area of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport. A hundred years ago, Snowden might have had an easier time escaping the clutches of the U.S. justice system — he could have just hopped over the sparsely populated, largely unguarded border with Canada and found a nice spot to hide out.
Monday, 22 July 2013 09:00

Advanced searching in Google Scholar

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Advanced searching in Google ScholarIn last month’s article, I outlined the reasons why advanced online searching skills are important to lawyers. And we explored some of the advanced searching features of Google Books. The various search features discussed in that article are accompanied with screen shots. You may find it helpful to review that article and the screen shots before reading the present article, in order to get familiarized with some of Google’s advanced search interfaces.
The quest to deal with minority populations in ChinaEthnic Tibetans living in the Tibetan Autonomous Region and other remote areas are experiencing difficult times. A shopping mall is being built directly in front of the iconic Jokhang Monastery in Lhasa. With a modern train system, millions of tourists, and a variety of economic development projects the visual landscape of old Tibet is being erased within our lifetime. To be sure this is progress for some, but it is not without a social and cultural cost.
Monday, 22 July 2013 09:00

Let’s get the wild ride back on track

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Let’s get the wild ride back on trackStrikes! New ministers! Bad press! It’s been a wild ride for immigration recently, and keeping up with the changes has been a Herculean effort for Canadian immigration practitioners. Keeping clients informed, processes moving, and addressing our own public opinion backlash continues to be the order of the day, but the uncertainty creates panic and a loss of faith in the overall system.
Monday, 22 July 2013 09:00

Duplicative class proceedings a no-no

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Duplicative class proceedings a no-noWhat happens when duplicative class proceedings are filed in the same jurisdiction on behalf of plaintiffs working in concert to advance overlapping claims?
Big Brother is alive and well and reading your Facebook postsIt sounds like a storyline out of a James Bond movie, or the latest Aaron Sorkin drama. But code name PRISM is the real-life alias of the United States National Security Agency’s massive data collection and surveillance computer program officially known as SIGAD US-984XN. It involves technology and media companies providing direct access to their customers’ information, including search histories, file transfers, e-mail content, and live chats, to the NSA, who reportedly studied only metadata of these communications for patterns, rather than the content.
Just saying . . . some things about the professionThis month’s column touches on a few topics, some new and some not so new.
Preparing to battle the lawyer who ‘wrote the book’Recently, my colleague and fellow Canadian Lawyer columnist Margaret Waddell urged all lawyers to make pro bono representation a part of their practice. I couldn’t agree more with Marg’s plea, and have taken it to heart.
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