Features

Monday, 07 April 2014 08:00

Pursuing pro bono in-house

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_April_ProBono.jpgWhen lawyers leave private practice and go in-house many may feel they are no longer easily able to pursue pro bono work, but the reality is corporate and public sector lawyers have skills that are in demand. There also appears to be growing interest from the in-house bar in pursuing pro bono activities.
Monday, 07 April 2014 08:00

An economic transformation

Written by
Photo: Huan Tran
Photo: Huan Tran
It’s not often business lawyers find themselves practising social justice. Redressing society’s wrongs may be familiar territory for human rights or sexual abuse claim lawyers, even criminal practitioners, but corporate and commercial lawyers? Yet Max Faille says that’s precisely what’s happening today at the crossroads of business and aboriginal law.
Monday, 03 March 2014 08:01

Assessing boots on the ground

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_March_cl_mar_14.jpgYou may not hear it very often, mostly because it’s just not good PR for the in-house bar, but despite data that points to fairly consistent growth in corporate legal departments, not all global or U.S.-based companies are wholly behind the idea that existing legal departments in Canada should remain status quo.
Monday, 03 March 2014 08:00

Still tempting

Written by
Illustration: Huan Tran
Illustration: Huan Tran
Canada still tempts cash-rich state-owned enterprises, even in the closely watched energy sector, but government rules and the deliberate ambiguity that surrounds them are making it hard to advise clients how to proceed and factoring into a steep investment slowdown.
Monday, 03 February 2014 08:00

Judging 101

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_February_judging.jpgThe benefits of judicial foreign aid are rarely measurable in concrete terms. But, for Ontario Court of Appeal Justice Marc Rosenberg — a workhorse in the movement to help developing nations enhance their justice systems — a dramatic exception to that rule came during a working foray to China a couple of years ago. Rosenberg was part of a Canadian entourage helping to draft rules for excluding unreliable evidence — coerced confessions, in particular. Overnight, a furor erupted over a Chinese convict who had confessed a decade earlier to murdering his wife, notwithstanding the absence of a body.
“Suddenly, his wife showed up — alive,” Rosenberg recalled. Humiliated, authorities hurriedly released the man from prison.
Monday, 03 February 2014 08:00

Droning on

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_February_dronejpg.jpgA number of businesses have teased customers in the past year or so with the suggestion online orders could be delivered by unmanned drones. We’ve had the Burrito Bomber — self-dubbed as “the world’s first airborne Mexican food delivery system,” — and variants such as the LobsterCopter, TacoCopter, and, most recently, Amazon.com Inc.’s Octocopters.
Monday, 06 January 2014 08:00

The case for ladies only

Written by
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_cl_jan_2014_cover.jpgIn their book Breaking Through: Tales from the Top Canadian Women General Counsel, Kirby Chown and Carrie Mandel interviewed 32 women general counsel, but one interview really illustrated the view of the current generation of female lawyers. One young woman questioned if there is still a need for groups that specifically champion the cause of women.
Monday, 06 January 2014 08:00

‘Lightning bolts out of the sky’

Written by
Illustration: Peter Mitchell
Illustration: Peter Mitchell
When Rob Kreklewetz started his legal career as a tax and trade lawyer in the 1980s, tax law was a staid, even gentlemanly field of practice involving mostly matters of income tax and other direct taxes. Lawyers “were brought in at the early stage, usually by the client’s accountant, before a notice of objection was filed,” he tells Canadian Lawyer from his office at Millar Kreklewetz LLP in Toronto. “We had 90 days to file (and) delay collection until the amount of collection was determined. It was all very orderly.”
Monday, 18 November 2013 08:01

Keeping up appearances

Written by
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2013_November_CL_Nov_13---DIGITAL-1.jpgFar from being mere bricks and mortar, courthouses are the physical embodiment of the justice system. Their design, appearance, and state of repair can affect the length of trials; help or hinder access to justice; protect — or expose — vulnerable parties; and inspire a sense of respect or disdain for the judicial process.
But lawyers across Canada admit many of these buildings, far from being a source of civic pride, hamper their efforts to represent clients in the most effective way.
Monday, 18 November 2013 08:01

The billing conundrum

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2013_November_123842533.jpgIn-house counsel are expecting to take on more work internally next year to handle growth in their companies, but the management of their external law firm spending remains an ongoing challenge they wrestle with in an attempt to find value and meet budgets.
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