Features

Giving back

Written by Posted Date: April 7th, 2014
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_April_cl_Apr_14.jpgMore than half of lawyers believe the profession has a duty to provide pro bono services, according to a survey of readers across the country conducted by Canadian Lawyer. But a strong majority of respondents oppose making pro bono work mandatory, and 60 per cent feel lawyers offering free legal services could discourage governments from providing sufficient legal aid funding.

Pro Bono Case Studies

Written by Posted Date: April 7th, 2014
Lawyers across Canada are involved in many types of pro bono work. Here are just a few examples of what they're doing.

Law firm pro bono survey

Written by Posted Date: April 7th, 2014
Click to view survey
Click to view survey
Across the country lawyers find the time to participate in interesting and important pro bono projects that give back to their communities and aid in providing access to justice for those who might not otherwise be able to afford legal counsel.

Pursuing pro bono in-house

  • Lawyers shouldn’t erase volunteer time from their personal docket when they go in-house.
Written by Posted Date: April 7th, 2014
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_April_ProBono.jpgWhen lawyers leave private practice and go in-house many may feel they are no longer easily able to pursue pro bono work, but the reality is corporate and public sector lawyers have skills that are in demand. There also appears to be growing interest from the in-house bar in pursuing pro bono activities.

An economic transformation

  • Legal Report: Aboriginal Law
Written by Posted Date: April 7th, 2014
Photo: Huan Tran
Photo: Huan Tran
It’s not often business lawyers find themselves practising social justice. Redressing society’s wrongs may be familiar territory for human rights or sexual abuse claim lawyers, even criminal practitioners, but corporate and commercial lawyers? Yet Max Faille says that’s precisely what’s happening today at the crossroads of business and aboriginal law.

Assessing boots on the ground

  • Cover Story
Written by Posted Date: March 3rd, 2014
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_March_cl_mar_14.jpgYou may not hear it very often, mostly because it’s just not good PR for the in-house bar, but despite data that points to fairly consistent growth in corporate legal departments, not all global or U.S.-based companies are wholly behind the idea that existing legal departments in Canada should remain status quo.

Still tempting

  • Legal Report: Energy Law
Written by Posted Date: March 3rd, 2014
Illustration: Huan Tran
Illustration: Huan Tran
Canada still tempts cash-rich state-owned enterprises, even in the closely watched energy sector, but government rules and the deliberate ambiguity that surrounds them are making it hard to advise clients how to proceed and factoring into a steep investment slowdown.

Judging 101

  • Cover Story
Written by Posted Date: February 3rd, 2014
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_February_judging.jpgThe benefits of judicial foreign aid are rarely measurable in concrete terms. But, for Ontario Court of Appeal Justice Marc Rosenberg — a workhorse in the movement to help developing nations enhance their justice systems — a dramatic exception to that rule came during a working foray to China a couple of years ago. Rosenberg was part of a Canadian entourage helping to draft rules for excluding unreliable evidence — coerced confessions, in particular. Overnight, a furor erupted over a Chinese convict who had confessed a decade earlier to murdering his wife, notwithstanding the absence of a body.
“Suddenly, his wife showed up — alive,” Rosenberg recalled. Humiliated, authorities hurriedly released the man from prison.

Droning on

Written by Posted Date: February 3rd, 2014
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_February_dronejpg.jpgA number of businesses have teased customers in the past year or so with the suggestion online orders could be delivered by unmanned drones. We’ve had the Burrito Bomber — self-dubbed as “the world’s first airborne Mexican food delivery system,” — and variants such as the LobsterCopter, TacoCopter, and, most recently, Amazon.com Inc.’s Octocopters.

The case for ladies only

  • Cover Story
Written by Posted Date: January 6th, 2014
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2014_cl_jan_2014_cover.jpgIn their book Breaking Through: Tales from the Top Canadian Women General Counsel, Kirby Chown and Carrie Mandel interviewed 32 women general counsel, but one interview really illustrated the view of the current generation of female lawyers. One young woman questioned if there is still a need for groups that specifically champion the cause of women.
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>
Page 1 of 20

Latest Videos

More Canadian Lawyer TV...

Digital Editions