Departments

b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2013_August_techsupport-bubbles.jpg“Too many deans are wedded to running their schools as businesses for which U.S. News & World Report rankings supply the definitive means of evaluation. Too many special interests relating to the lending and debt collection industries make a lot of money off the growing lawyer bubble. Too many senior partners in big firms have become accustomed to extraordinary incomes and are unwilling to emphasize long-run values that don’t contribute to the current year’s bottom line.”
Steven J. Harper,
The Lawyer Bubble: A Profession in Crisis

Tuesday, 02 July 2013 09:00

A win-win career

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Manitoba skip Jennifer Jones during the gold medal game at this year’s Scotties Tournament of Hearts. Photo: Reuters/Mark Blinch
Manitoba skip Jennifer Jones during the gold medal game at this year’s Scotties Tournament of Hearts. Photo: Reuters/Mark Blinch
Jennifer Jones is a bit of a planner but, at the moment, she’s taking it one day at a time. First it was a career in law. Well, curling actually came first. Then the law degree. Then came more curling, a flexible job in corporate law, more curling, more law. And now a baby along with a life straddling two provinces.
Monday, 03 June 2013 08:00

The wind down

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Illustration: Sara Tyson
Illustration: Sara Tyson
What if you’ve decided it’s been a great career but the time has arrived to take your name off the shingle and move on? What will your retirement income be and what becomes of your firm and your clients in your absence?
Monday, 06 May 2013 08:00

E-discovery and the M&A deal

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_dera-nevin.jpgMost people assume e-discovery law and practice are relevant only to litigators and those involved in responding to regulatory requests and investigations. Not so. E-discovery law and operations are highly relevant to corporate lawyers involved in the acquisition and divestiture of businesses and corporate assets. Avoiding the e-discovery implications of corporate transactions, both in the due diligence and post-acquisition phases, can increase risk to corporate clients.
Illustration: Matthew Billington
Illustration: Matthew Billington
Lawyers on the go are increasingly exploring options for accessing information from offsite locations. This trend promises to continue as more and more portable digital platforms are developed and enter the market. Smartphones, an array of tablets, along with the old laptop computer, allow us to take a phenomenal amount of technology just about anywhere. Combined with emerging services like cloud computing we can also have access to the office, complete with software and reference material.
Monday, 01 April 2013 09:00

Quantifying value through time codes

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Last November, Matthew Whalley posted on the LinkedIn discussion group Knowledge Management for Legal Professionals a presentation he authored with Ian Rodwell entitled “Valuing Value-Add,” in which they compare the respective perceptions of clients and lawyers of the “value-added” services lawyers provide their clients. Among the observations Whalley and Rodwell draw are, first, the divergence between clients and their lawyers with respect to the efficiencies generated for clients by “value-added” services (lawyers believed the potential efficiencies to be much greater than the clients) and, second, the need for a better understanding by lawyers of the value of the services they deliver outside legal advice.
Monday, 04 March 2013 08:00

Separation of church and state

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Illustration: Jacqui Oakley
Illustration: Jacqui Oakley
When two Iranian medical doctors married in a civil ceremony in London, England in 1991 — and again in an Islamic marriage ceremony in Berlin two years later — the wife had no reason to think the terms of her marriage contract would be questioned in Canada, where the couple later settled and then separated after 13 years.
Monday, 04 March 2013 08:00

Why does e-discovery cost so much?

Written by
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_Columnists_dera-nevin.jpgI often use this column to answer questions I am asked in my practice. So it’s time to tackle the most common question I hear: “Why does this e-discovery cost so much?” Many can’t stomach e-discovery because it’s inscrutable, leaves little measurable benefit, and simply costs a lot.
Monday, 04 February 2013 08:00

A broader vision

Written by
Photo: Sandra Strangemore
Photo: Sandra Strangemore
Newly elected deputy prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, James Stewart, has not led an everyday life. Although he was educated like many other Canadian lawyers, having earned a BA from Queen’s University, a master’s from Université de Laval, and a law degree from the University of Toronto, Stewart knew early on being a cookie-cutter lawyer was not for him. He wanted to be elsewhere — and he found what he was looking for in Tanzania and The Hague. “I was never interested in the business of law,” says Stewart. “I was interested in travel and the wider world. I read history. I worked in the West Indies after my first degree. I travelled to Europe right after my call to the bar in 1977. I was always drawn to things outside my immediate experience.”
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2013_February_tech_km_copy.jpgAmong the various knowledge management conferences and seminars I attended in the last year, two in particular exemplify some of the divergent preoccupations of the field.
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