Commentary

Tuesday, 03 January 2012 09:18

Good things ahead for 2012

Written by
With this January 2012 issue of Canadian Lawyer, we kick off our 36th year of covering the issues and trends that matter to the legal profession in Canada. And we have seen a lot of changes, particularly in the last few years. One of the biggest shifts has been the arrival of global law practices on our shores. This month, Macleod Dixon LLP will be folded into the Norton Rose Group, which rocked the Canadian legal establishment last year when it merged with Ogilvy Renault LLP. The face of law practice is changing here and so this year, we have launched a new series on canadianlawyermag.com called the Managing Partner Forum, in which law firm leaders from across the country and all types of firms will discuss the hurdles, successes, and other travails of making it work in today’s market. We launch the series this month with a column from John Coleman, who helmed Ogilvy Renault through its initial merger as well as the marriage with Macleod Dixon to form the new Norton Rose Canada. I look forward to the columns creating some interesting discussions in the profession.
As well, we’ve got a host of new online columnists coming on board for 2012 at canadianlawyermag.com. We welcome Kirk Baert, who will be penning a monthly missive on the state of class action litigation — and not wanting to have it too plaintiff-side heavy, he will be bringing on some guest columnists from the defence side. And one of the things I’ve heard most in my travels is that newly minted lawyers feel a lot less sure of themselves and their futures than they once did and there’s not a lot of information out there to help them along in their careers. So we are launching two new online columns specifically aimed at young lawyers. One is The Accidental Mentor, in which Ontario Bar Association past president Lee Akazaki does his best Dear Abby impression and answers queries of all types from junior associates looking for some guidance. And from the trenches, we have first-year associate Lindsay Scott, who will be sharing the hard lessons she’s learned on the job.
I am also happy to be starting 2012 with our latest Top 10 lists of legal boutiques. Labour and employment and intellectual property boutiques are some of the most prominent in the legal field and it’s always a good competition. Check out this year’s list starting on page 33. As always, I look forward to hearing reader feedback on anything we are doing and anything you think we should be doing. Have a great year.
With this January 2012 issue of Canadian Lawyer, we kick off our 36th year of covering the issues and trends that matter to the legal profession in Canada. And we have seen a lot of changes, particularly in the last few years. One of the biggest shifts has been the arrival of global law practices on our shores. This month, Macleod Dixon LLP will be folded into the Norton Rose Group, which rocked the Canadian legal establishment last year when it merged with Ogilvy Renault LLP. The face of law practice is changing here and so this year, we have launched a new series on canadianlawyermag.com called the Managing Partner Forum, in which law firm leaders from across the country and all types of firms will discuss the hurdles, successes, and other travails of making it work in today’s market. We launch the series this month with a column from John Coleman, who helmed Ogilvy Renault through its initial merger as well as the marriage with Macleod Dixon to form the new Norton Rose Canada. I look forward to the columns creating some interesting discussions in the profession.
Monday, 14 November 2011 08:00

Expect a strong and growing law-and-order bias

Written by
Illustration: Matt Daley
Illustration: Matt Daley
Michael Moldaver and Andromache Karakatsanis are our new Supreme Court judges. They replace justices Ian Binnie and Louise Charron, who in May both announced their resignation. (It sure takes a long time to fill a Supreme Court vacancy.) Will this change in the court’s composition have much effect on criminal law?
Monday, 14 November 2011 08:00

More work for in-house departments

Written by
Once again in this issue, we share the results of the annual Canadian Lawyer corporate counsel survey, which gauges the relationship between in-house counsel and their outside legal service providers. It’s not surprising that one of our main findings is that the economy, and its current state of instability, is having an effect on corporate law departments.
Monday, 03 October 2011 09:00

My election wish list

Written by
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2011_October_jim_middlemiss2011.jpgWith five provinces scheduled to go to the polls in 2011 and three more expected to go next year, it’s a good time for the legal community to be advancing its election wish list.
Sunday, 02 October 2011 08:45

Don't get left behind

Written by
In September, the Competition Bureau released a post-study assessment to its 2007 report that looked at restrictions impeding competition in five professions, including the law. The profession had been on tenterhooks as to what the assessment would say and how it would affect the regulation, in particular, of the profession across the country.
Monday, 05 September 2011 09:00

Reflections on a changed world

Written by
This month’s cover story, “A decade on,” examines the state of anti-terrorism laws in Canada over the decade since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in the United States. These efforts have two difficult issues to surmount, and they are the same ones faced by many countries, including the U.S.: how to heighten security while balancing individual rights and freedoms, and how to fight a “war” on terror that’s often beyond national borders and doesn’t involve a state player. Not an easy task for any government.
Monday, 05 September 2011 09:00

Too much secrecy

Written by
Illustration: Scott Page
Illustration: Scott Page
My mother used to chastise me as a teenager when I got cocky, warning me never to get too big for my britches. Basically, it was an ego check. She was reminding me not to be conceited and show an exaggerated sense of my own importance.
Illustration: Todd Julie
Illustration: Todd Julie
Starting a legal career is daunting, whether you begin as a big-firm associate, member of a small partnership, solo practitioner, government lawyer, or in-house counsel; whether you start out on Bay Street, in the burbs, or on a country road.
Monday, 01 August 2011 11:55

Adapt or die

Written by
b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-CANADIANLawyer_2011_August_gail_j_cohen.jpgThe big news of this issue is, of course, our second annual Top 25 Most Influential list. Our first effort last year got quite a bit of feedback, and we took that into account when planning this latest edition. Nominations came from readers, members of last year’s list, as well as an internal panel of Canadian Lawyer and Law Times writers and editors. We think it’s a pretty good mix of people and really showcases some of the influential voices in the legal profession in Canada.
Monday, 04 July 2011 10:46

Carrying on a winning tradition

Written by
Art director Bill Hunter, staff writer Robert Todd, and myself celebrating our success at the KRW Awards last month. Photo: Heather Gardiner
Art director Bill Hunter, staff writer Robert Todd, and myself celebrating our success at the KRW Awards last month. Photo: Heather Gardiner
We are very proud of the journalism we do here at Canadian Lawyer and once again I am happy to announce that at this year’s KRW Awards, which recognize the best in the Canadian business press, our magazine took home a gold and two silver awards. The gold award was in the best marketing/merchandising article and was won by Montreal lawyer and freelance writer Ava Chisling for our May 2010 cover story “How am I doing?” The story looked at the steps Canadian law firms, both small and large, are taking towards integrating client feedback into their firms’ culture.
<< Start < Prev 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next > End >>
Page 7 of 17

Latest Videos

  • Making Rain episode 55 - Value your time In this month’s episode, executive coach Debra Forman discusses focusing your efforts on how you bill and value your time. Time should be your biggest…
  • Worlds apart Jessica Salomon spent five years as a war crimes prosecutor but left law to pursue a career in stand-up. Here’s a taste of her wry…
More Canadian Lawyer TV...

Digital Editions