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Monday, 13 December 2010 10:15

Research worth 1.4 million bucks

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Benjamin Richardson’s research will focus on environmental law and sustainability.
Benjamin Richardson’s research will focus on environmental law and sustainability.
University of British Columbia law professor Benjamin J. Richardson was recently awarded the senior chair in environmental law and sustainability by the Canada Research Chairs program.
Monday, 06 December 2010 10:36

Pictures and profits

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Robert C. Sheehan of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP
Robert C. Sheehan of Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP
Researchers at the University of Toronto and Tufts University in Boston, Mass., have discovered that college yearbook photos of law firm managing partners are positively correlated to that partner’s firm profitability sometimes 40 years later.
Monday, 06 December 2010 10:22

Don’t fear failure

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Being rejected during the recruiting process does not mean the end of your law career. illustration: Shutterstock
Being rejected during the recruiting process does not mean the end of your law career. illustration: Shutterstock
It has now been a full month since the end of recruitment and the fallout has only started to clear up. Months and months of preparation culminated in an epic battle for the golden prize of a coveted law job. For some, the sleepless nights of resumé formatting and the years of hard work finally paid off. A phone call at 5 p.m., a job in your pocket, and one step closer to “making it” in the world. For others: silence.
Monday, 29 November 2010 09:49

An outside perspective

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UNB law dean Ian Peach says external reviews help faculties think about the way forward.
UNB law dean Ian Peach says external reviews help faculties think about the way forward.
The University of Toronto Faculty of Law recently posted its latest external review online. This got us thinking: do all law schools undergo external reviews? We spoke to six law schools across the country about this very common, yet rarely spoken of, practice.

Canada’s commercial code, as it stands now, does not accommodate nearly any of the special needs of First Nation communities. The code does not incorporate any of the special traditions in aboriginal communities nor does it clearly outline the differences in doing business on First Nation reserves. For these reasons, commercial businesses are often reluctant to do business on First Nation reserves.

 

Monday, 15 November 2010 05:47

Legal community not ‘too Asian’

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b_150_0_16777215_00___images_stories_01-4STUDENTS_2010_November_facl_conference_2010.jpgIn light of the Maclean’s and Toronto Star’s recent articles about Asian students in Canadian universities — it’s certainly not “too Asian” yet in the legal community. Just when issues of diversity and the integration of visible minorities have landed again on the debate table, last weekend’s fourth annual Federation of Asian Canadian Lawyers conference addressed these issues in the legal profession.

 

Monday, 15 November 2010 04:24

A party with a purpose

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(l to r) Caroline Lutes, Heenan Blaikie articling student and co-chairwoman of Give a Night; Lindsay Scott, Paliare Roland articling student and co-chairwoman of Give a Night; Dr. Jane Philpott, founder of the Give a Day to world AIDS movement; and Lia Bruschetta, Oslers articling student and co-chairwoman of Give a Night.
(l to r) Caroline Lutes, Heenan Blaikie articling student and co-chairwoman of Give a Night; Lindsay Scott, Paliare Roland articling student and co-chairwoman of Give a Night; Dr. Jane Philpott, founder of the Give a Day to world AIDS movement; and Lia Bruschetta, Oslers articling student and co-chairwoman of Give a Night.
Fifty articling students in Toronto have decided their gruelling schedules aren’t too busy to plan one heck of a party. That is, a party with a purpose: raising money for world AIDS charities.

Monday, 08 November 2010 05:46

Facing mental illness in the law

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Kelly Rowlett likes flexibility. She recently met with a client in Halifax instead of Rowlett’s Dartmouth office because her client faced a unique dilemma. The client wasn’t allowed to cross the MacKay Bridge due to her problems with suicide. So Rowlett agreed to meet in Halifax.


Monday, 01 November 2010 01:00

Waging lawfare

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Shortly after Sept. 11, 2001, former American general Charles Dunlap wrote an essay warning of the risk that “lawfare” — the application of international law to inflict strategic damage on an opponent with the aim of achieving military objectives — could be used against the U.S. in its emerging “war on terror.”

 

Monday, 25 October 2010 07:00

Living the dream

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Morgan Sim interned at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania.
Morgan Sim interned at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania.
The 24-hour journey to Kilimanjaro airport felt like one giant leap of faith. Tearfully bidding farewell to my husband at Pearson airport in Toronto, I knew very little about where I would stay or what I would be doing when I landed on a continent I had never visited. I arrived at night in a city with few paved roads and fewer street lights in an unmarked United Nations van complete with armed guard. Thus began my summer as a chambers intern at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania.

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