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Making charity law a part of your legal educationAsk the average law student what charity law means and you may get an answer like: “It’s doing pro bono work, right?” Wrong. With 86,000 charities, Canada’s charitable sector is the second largest in the world, employing two million people and accounting for about 8 per cent of the GDP, significantly more than both the agriculture and the retail sectors. Charity law is composed of the unique legal frameworks that govern these diverse entities combined with broader areas of law (e.g. employment, real estate, etc.) as they apply to the special circumstances of charitable work. Law schools and law students need to do a better job of making charity law a part of their legal education.
Monday, 21 November 2016 09:00

Mindfulness for Law Students

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Mindfulness for Law StudentsNovember is tough. Exam stress begins to mount. You start to realize you’re not as ready as you wanted to be, as you should be, and naturally you start to panic. I thought it would be useful to write about my own experience that may help my colleagues during this tense time — my foray into the world of mindfulness. Admittedly, I have always been fairly cynical when it comes to this topic: meditation, inward focus, training the brain as though it was a muscle; it all seemed too passive. However, I have come to realize the importance of strong mental health especially at times when anxiety is palpable, like exam time, and I would like to share why this topic piqued my interest, how I have started to incorporate a new habit in my daily routine and the potential benefits.
Monday, 24 October 2016 09:00

Stop procrastinating! Remember the big picture

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Stop procrastinating! Remember the big pictureWe all do it — some more than others. Everyone has delayed starting an unfavourable task. You’re probably procrastinating right now. As law students, there is an endless supply of readings, assignments and papers to be done and, yet, our houses are immaculate or we are entirely caught up with Netflix (all of Netflix). It’s important to remind ourselves of the end goal: becoming a lawyer. 
Monday, 10 October 2016 09:00

Killing the LPP and resistance to innovation

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Killing the LPP and resistance to innovationSo the Law Society of Upper Canada has been invited by one of its committees to deep-six the Legal Practice Program. Convocation is set to vote on a proposal by the Professional Development and Competence Committee on Nov. 9. The question now is, “What next?”
Employers are searching: Presenting your best Internet selfAsk to borrow a friend’s computer and Google your name. What comes up? It is likely that your Facebook profile has the top spot, and LinkedIn is quite close behind. What happens if you scroll through the second, third, perhaps even fourth page? Better yet, what happens when you click on that Facebook link? Are you proud of everything you see?
September: Law students should take it in strideFor many, September represents a time of new resolutions. Stemming from those ingrained back-to-school feelings, many individuals set new goals. For law students, the prospect of overcoming last year’s academic struggles can guide their September aspirations. No matter what year a law student is in, the fall renews ambition. There are clubs to join, moots to consider, potential jobs to look into and study habits to improve. Whether starting your law school career or breezing into third year, a successful school year requires a plan in September. Here are a few suggestions to maintain a level head academically, while still participating in extracurricular activities.
Monday, 08 August 2016 09:00

The new Calgary Curriculum: what we’ve done

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The new Calgary Curriculum: what we’ve doneIn my very first column in this series, which I entitled “What we know,” I offered a number of things that, to my lights at least, discredit the conventional model of legal education and lawyer training as we know it in Canada. Our duty, I said, is to prepare students for the profession they’re joining, not the one we joined. And there is no question, I argued, that their profession is going to look different from ours. From this it follows — axiomatically, it seems to me — that we have to reconsider how we “do” law school. What was relevant to us in the 20th century may or may not be relevant to our students in the 21st. And if it isn't, then we owe it to our students — and at the risk of sounding corny, to the rule of law in Canada — to get rid of it and put something better in its place.
Monday, 01 August 2016 11:20

4Students Fall 2016 Supplement

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With strong recommendations in the report of the Truth and Reconcilliation Commission, we look at what's happening in the area of changes to legal education at law schools across the country.

Monday, 06 June 2016 09:00

Your courtroom is ready!

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TRU law students have created an app to help lawyers, self-reps with timing of hearings.
TRU law students have created an app to help lawyers, self-reps with timing of hearings.
It started as an idea taken from the restaurant trade where patrons are given a buzzer that indicates when their table is ready. A group of Thompson Rivers University law students have taken that concept and evolved it into an app that allows lawyers or self-litigants to know when a hearing on an application before the B.C. Supreme Court justice may occur during the day.
Monday, 30 May 2016 09:00

Oops, I did it again!

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Oops, I did it again!I don’t imagine that Britney Spears has often thought about the Canadian legal profession. But if she did, she might have been forgiven for having been inspired to name her second album by watching us in action. To paraphrase Abba Eban, we never seem to miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity — an opportunity, that is, to chart a new course in the relationship between the practising arm of the profession and the teaching one.
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