Issue Archive

Monday, 26 August 2013 09:09

To specialize or not to specialize?

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To specialize or not to specialize?For many young lawyers starting out in the profession today, “it’s not so much about finding a job of your dreams, but finding a job,” admits legal recruiter Warren Bongard, president of ZSA Recruitment. But can specializing early on help students land a coveted role that reflects their passions, and mould them into more competent lawyers?
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:08

Q & A with Peter Jenkins

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Q & A with Peter JenkinsAdjunct professor Peter Jenkins teaches a course at Osgoode Hall Law School called Legal values: Law, ethics & social media. Offered for the second time in the winter 2014 term, it’s a small first-year course open to 20 students, with five spots reserved for upper-year students. Jenkins spoke with 4Students assistant editor Heather Gardiner about the course.
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:07

Not your typical law student

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Chris Clarke has body piercings in the double-digits, but he’s not going to let stereotypes get in the way of his goal to practise law. Photo: Grant Romancia
Chris Clarke has body piercings in the double-digits, but he’s not going to let stereotypes get in the way of his goal to practise law. Photo: Grant Romancia
Like many, Chris Clarke made a few stops along the way before he got to law school. Almost 10 years ago, Clarke picked up an unusual hobby — face and body piercing. He even set up his own business making house calls for those who want a piercing but might be reluctant to stroll into their neighbourhood tattoo and piercing parlour.
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:06

Mentorship 101

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Illustration: Magoz
Illustration: Magoz
Are you my mentor?” It’s a question Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg warns is “a total mood killer” in her book Lean In. But for law students searching for guidance, it’s a valid question.
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:05

Lakehead law launches

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Lakehead’s law school will be situated in an old high school with a panoramic view of Lake Superior.
Lakehead’s law school will be situated in an old high school with a panoramic view of Lake Superior.
Given the state of the legal profession — which is witnessing drops in fees, reductions in associate pay, and a growing shortage of articling positions — you might wonder why Ontario needs its first new law school in four decades, and why it should be at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay. The answer may lie in the fact that on the head of Lake  Superior, halfway between Winnipeg and Sault Ste. Marie, where the temperature drops below zero 200 days a year, the situation for law school graduates is not nearly as bleak as it is elsewhere. In fact, it seems they can’t get enough lawyers there.
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:04

The pros & cons of practising...

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Practising personal injury law, in the B.C. Interior, IT law, in Halifax
Monday, 26 August 2013 09:03

Blue rose

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Painting: Jessica Tara
Painting: Jessica Tara
Originally from British Columbia, Jessica Tara is a second-year law student at the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University in Halifax. She has enjoyed various artistic pursuits throughout her life, including drawing, painting, photography, bookmaking, graphic design, and web site design. She painted Blue rose in Victoria in 2009 using acrylic paint. More recently she discovered her passion for garment sewing and creating mosaics from seashells and other sea objects. She takes inspiration from her dual life between two coastal cities and credits her grandparents for encouraging her artistic endeavours and law school.

Monday, 26 August 2013 09:00

Building a law school doesn't mean it is one

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Building new law schools seems like a good solution for the overabundance of applicants to Canadian law schools these days. The fact that there are more graduates than articling positions is a debate for another time.
Monday, 25 February 2013 08:01

On the cusp of change

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Illustration: Huan Tran
Illustration: Huan Tran
Ontario’s articling crisis is no secret. Statistics show 15 per cent of applicants were unable to get an articling position in 2012, and that number is expected to rise. Some blame the law schools, others point at law firms, but there isn’t any one reason for this problem. More applicants than ever are seeking entry to the legal profession, including those who have studied abroad — possibly because they couldn’t get a spot in a Canadian law school — and fewer law firms are offering articling positions as a result of the recent economic downturn.
Monday, 25 February 2013 08:00

Time to tweet

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Time to tweetSocial media is everywhere.
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